SET tablename[startcolumn,startrow] {}

The syntax above adds or rewrites data in a table.

  • tablename: The name of the table with full path.
  • startcolumn: Sets the starting column which to set data from.
  • startrow: Sets the starting row which to set data from.

Theoretical example

Command:

SET table01[1,1]
{
new record, new record, new record
new record, new record, new record
new record, new record, new record
}

Output:


Practical example

Command:

SET table01[1,1]
{
new record, new record, new record
new record, new record, new record
new record, new record, new record
}

Output:

SET::TABLE01[1,1]

You can see that the data we had been set is fitting into the existing table. What would be the consequences of putting a wider data range into the table? The answer is:

Command:

SET table01[3,3]
{
new record, new record, new record
new record, new record, new record
new record, new record, new record
}

Output:

You can see that the table has been automatically resized itself. Two new columns and rows have been created.


SET tablename[startcolumn,-1] {}

The syntax above adds a new row into a table. In case of empty brackets an empty row will be added.

  • tablename: The name of the table with full path.
  • startcolumn: Starting point of the column for the data insertion.
  • -1: Indicating new row creation.

Theoretical example

Command:

SET table01[0,-1]
{
new record, new record, new record, new record
}

Output:



SET tablename[-1,startrow] {}

The syntax above adds a new column into a table. In case of empty brackets an empty column will be added.

  • tablename: The name of the table with full path.
  • -1: Indicating new column creation.
  • startrow: Starting point of the row of the data insertion.

Theoretical example

Command:

SET table01[-1,0]
{
new record
new record
new record
new record
}

Output: